SJM renews its corporate image

Jesuit Migrant Service (SJM Spain) renews its corporate image to continue the consolidation of its work of accompaniment, serve and advocacy for the rights of migrants and refugees. SJM was born more than 10 years ago now as a network that agglutinates the Jesuit social organizations that work with migrants in different cities. During past few years, this network has enhanced and covers more locations. This change is consistent with the mission ad vision that have been with SJM since the very beginning: the must of answer to social transformation and the certainty that mobility and adaptation are inherent attributes of human beings.

This image and website restyling is an instrument that helps to convey who we are in the actual context. New logo is a more simplified, modern and stylish figure, with the same colour as Social Apostolate in Spain, to which SJM belongs. The soft typography symbolises the closeness and warmth with which both staff and volunteers perform their duties every day.

The ’M’ of migrants represents our main essence: the top is a bridge of approach and encounter with other cultures and religions, where diversity is richness and there is no place for discrimination. The bottom part are three pillars that represent the three words of our motto (and JRS’ as well): accompany, serve and advocate.

SJM is made up of Jesuit social entities that works for the defence of the rights of migrants and their full access to citizenship, presents in 10 cities: Barcelona (Migra Studium), Bilbao (Fund. Ellacuría), Burgos (Atalaya Intercultural), Madrid (Pueblos Unidos-Padre Rubio), San Sebastián (Asoc. Loiolaetxea), Sevilla (Asoc. Claver), Tudela (Centro Lasa), Valencia (SJM Valencia), Valladolid (Red Íncola), alongside with a technical office in Madrid and a legal office in Melilla (Southern Border).

The Jesuits Social Sector of the joins the citizen complaints about the lack of legal assistance and information about the rights of migrants arriving in the Canary Islands

Several organizations denounce the lack of legal assistance and interpretation in the first research activities of migrants carried out by the police in the Canary Islands, including the Illustrious Bar Association of Las Palmas. In this way, people are deprived of a guarantee provided by law. Ignoring the legal framework, they can hardly express their needs for protection. In the past, numerous entities have denounced the poor reception conditions of migrants arriving in the Canary Islands, whether they have an international protection profile or not: among them, the Migrants with Rights Network (Red Migrantes con Derechos), which includes the Social Sector of the Society of Jesus.

The Social Sector, which is part of JRS (Jesuit Refugee Service) and has experience in the southern border through SJM; in the countries of origin and transit with Alboan and Entreculturas; and with children and youth through the Mimbre network, maintains close contact with the diocesan secretariats of migration, with other entities and with some journalists who cover the situation, supporting their work and their demands. Through these channels, it is in contact with some Malian migrants with a clear asylum profile through subsidiary protection, who fear being returned without having been able to apply for international protection. They explain that the day after their arrival, the police gave them a document. A translator simply assured them that this paper did not necessarily imply that they would be returned. But no lawyer explained to them their rights or how to apply for international protection. Nor did they give them the names of their lawyers and interpreters, so they could not maintain contact. After two months, they are confined to a hotel, passing the quarantine, without anyone having advised them of their rights or taken steps to request protection. They fear that the police will send them back to Mali, a country in armed conflict, even via Mauritania.

SEE HERE THE FULL STATEMENT

More than 58,000 people accompanied by the SJM network in 201

The Jesuit Migrant Service (SJM) presents its 2019 Annual Report, a year in which the work of accompanying, serving and defending migrants and refugees, and their full access to citizenship, has been consolidated. A total of 58,965 people were accompanied in 2019 by the entities that form part of the network in the different lines of work.

In the line of Inclusion, which aims to provide integration tools to the migrant population in the cities where we work, almost 40,000 people were accompanied in individualized legal, labour and psycho-social assistance; first reception and basic orientation; and in employability and training projects.

The Frontera Sur (Southern Border) office in Melilla, which offers legal advice as well as human rights observation, assisted 530 people of 21 different nationalities last year, in addition 130 legal actions have been carried out before different authorities and institutions.

In Hospitality, the line of reception for especially vulnerable forced migrants, 460 people were received in more than 70 solidarity initiatives by lay groups, family networks and religious communities. The Community Sponsorship project in the Basque Country was the most innovative action of the year. 53 of the people welcomed were women who took part in gender-specific projects. Many of the people welcomed were unaccompanied young people.

Another of the lines of work is the presence in CIE (Internment and Foreigner Centres) where a group of volunteers and technicians visit the interns in 5 different places in the territory. In 2019, in addition to presenting the ninth annual report, 1462 visits were made to 793 people; and 61 legal actions were carried out in order to improve the conditions of internment and to work towards the end of these inhumane centres.

The Interreligious Dialogue line was given a strong boost with the consolidation of three spaces for raising awareness about the diversity of beliefs, which were attended by almost 7,000 people (mostly students from educational centres) and the proliferation of numerous cultural exchange activities, in which more than 1,600 people participated.  

The strategic line of Migrant Women and Domestic Work continued to support almost 5,000 women, especially in the areas of work and training. The work focused on strengthening their lines of defence of rights in home and care work spaces and raising awareness among the public, as well as advocacy with political authorities. In the area of Citizenship and Participation there were numerous innovative initiatives to strengthen community ties in the neighbourhoods and to promote the autonomy and voice of migrants. 420 people attended spaces for citizen participation and some 1,500 attended leisure and free time initiatives.The SJM sincerely and lovingly thanks all the people who make this work possible, which aims to achieve social justice and greater inclusion and equality for migrants: more than 1,200 volunteers and almost 70 members of the technical and managerial teams that make up the team that drives SJM’s work.