The Jesuits Social Sector of the joins the citizen complaints about the lack of legal assistance and information about the rights of migrants arriving in the Canary Islands

Several organizations denounce the lack of legal assistance and interpretation in the first research activities of migrants carried out by the police in the Canary Islands, including the Illustrious Bar Association of Las Palmas. In this way, people are deprived of a guarantee provided by law. Ignoring the legal framework, they can hardly express their needs for protection. In the past, numerous entities have denounced the poor reception conditions of migrants arriving in the Canary Islands, whether they have an international protection profile or not: among them, the Migrants with Rights Network (Red Migrantes con Derechos), which includes the Social Sector of the Society of Jesus.

The Social Sector, which is part of JRS (Jesuit Refugee Service) and has experience in the southern border through SJM; in the countries of origin and transit with Alboan and Entreculturas; and with children and youth through the Mimbre network, maintains close contact with the diocesan secretariats of migration, with other entities and with some journalists who cover the situation, supporting their work and their demands. Through these channels, it is in contact with some Malian migrants with a clear asylum profile through subsidiary protection, who fear being returned without having been able to apply for international protection. They explain that the day after their arrival, the police gave them a document. A translator simply assured them that this paper did not necessarily imply that they would be returned. But no lawyer explained to them their rights or how to apply for international protection. Nor did they give them the names of their lawyers and interpreters, so they could not maintain contact. After two months, they are confined to a hotel, passing the quarantine, without anyone having advised them of their rights or taken steps to request protection. They fear that the police will send them back to Mali, a country in armed conflict, even via Mauritania.

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